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April 21, 2005

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A partial solution - but a hefty one - to California's tax problem would be reform of Proposition 13, the 27-year-old property tax change that started similar movements all around the country and has done so much to damage public schools here.

Fixing Prop. 13 need not spur the kind of outrage that caused it to pass in the first place. Leave the current system regarding residential property alone, but kick commercial/industrial property out from under Prop. 13's protection.

Neat site... I think I am just going to browse about for a bit.

Neat site... I think I am just going to browse about for a bit.

The Republicans have been pretty effective in campaigning against progressive taxation. All Americans believe that they (or their kids) will hit lotto someday, and don't want to be heavily taxed when that day comes. It's nuts, but . . .

The Republicans have been pretty effective in campaigning against progressive taxation. All Americans believe that they (or their kids) will hit lotto someday, and don't want to be heavily taxed when that day comes. It's nuts, but . . .

Yes, Prop. 13 has to be reformed if we are to restore effective government in California. Government here is broken because, out of terror of tax increases, voters since the 70s have passed a series of initiatives that make it almost impossible for their elected representatives to do anything. Revenue available and the spending of what does exist are limited by constitutional restraints. So we are governed very ineptly by initiative. Arnold ran against the gridlock -- and it now looks like we Democrats may be able to trap him as well in the morass.

The question for California (and increasingly for the rest of the country) is becoming, how bad do things have to get before a majority starts asking for government to solve problems proactively?

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